Nurses’ and consumers’ knowledge and understanding of antimicrobial stewardship and infection prevention and control in paediatrics

Mrs Mataya Kilpatrick1, Dr Stephane Bouchoucha1, Associate Professor Ana Hutchinson1,2

1Deakin University, Geelong, Australia, 2Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research – Epworth HealthCare Partnership, Richmond, Australia

Objective:

The aim in this systematic review was to examine nurses’ and consumers’ (children and parents) knowledge and understanding of antimicrobial stewardship and infection prevention and control in acute paediatric care settings.

Methods:

An integrative mixed methods approach was used due to the heterogeneity of published studies in this field. Studies were included if they examined the factors that contributed to nurses’ adherence to, or consumers practice in relation to, infection prevention and control. We searched four electronic databases for prospective original research published to date addressing the research objective. Quality assessments, data extraction and analysis were completed on all included studies. The following outcomes measures were extracted: nurses’ knowledge, attitudes and adherence to infection prevention policies and hand hygiene, nurses’ knowledge of antimicrobial stewardship, consumers’ knowledge of and adherence to infection prevention and control and hand hygiene, and consumers’ knowledge of antimicrobial resistance and appropriate antibiotic use.

Results:

The titles and abstracts of 15,272 were screened by two researchers, and 44 studies conducted in the following areas: emergency, oncology, general medicine, surgery, and specialist outpatients were included. The majority focused on nurse’s antibiotic use (5), and infection prevention and control policies (10). Six studies investigated consumers’ knowledge of antimicrobial stewardship, and four looked at educating consumers on antimicrobial stewardship and infection prevention and control.

Conclusion:

Although the current evidence suggests that education is provided to consumers’ regarding hand hygiene and infection prevention, there is a lack of studies evaluating their knowledge of appropriate antibiotic use in acute care settings.


Biography:

Mataya Kilpatrick is a PhD candidate at Deakin University after receiving a University Scholarship, she is also an academic at Deakin and research nurse at MCRI. After completing her Bachelor of Nursing (honours) in 2018 she has been published in the American Journal of Infection Control and in Infection, Disease and Health. Her PhD thesis is on antimicrobial stewardship and infection prevention and control activities for nurses and consumers in an acute paediatric setting.

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