Using AURA Surveillance System data to improve infection prevention and control

Jan Gralton1, Kim Stewart1, Kathryn Daveson1, Kathy Meleady1

1Australian Commission on Safety and Quality In Health Care, Sydney, Australia

Introduction:

The Antimicrobial Use and Resistance in Australia (AURA) Surveillance System was established by the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care in 2014 to provide a nationally coordinated system for surveillance of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and antimicrobial use. Ongoing increases in the breadth, volume and geographic representativeness of AURA data enable hospitals to monitor local patterns of AMR and antimicrobial prescribing and use. AURA data can also be used with other hospital data to develop locally targeted infection prevention and control (IPC) responses.

Methods: 

A framework has been developed to illustrate how AURA data and other hospital information systems, such as healthcare-associated (HAI) infection surveillance data, can be used together.

Results:

This framework provides hospitals with more clarity regarding patients at most risk of HAI acquisition during their hospital stay. This information can be used to develop local IPC responses that are specifically targeted to protect patients at high risk of HAI acquisition.

Discussion:

No two microorganisms and no two patients are the same; local IPC services need ready access to robust, local information to identify these differences. This framework provides IPC services with timely information that acknowledges the nuances associated with different microorganisms, changing resistance patterns and variation in patient risk factors and behaviours – all of which may increase or decrease the likelihood of HAI acquisition.

Conclusion:

Hospitals can use AURA data, alongside other datasets, to inform the direction of their local IPC program.


Biography:

Jan Gralton is currently a senior advisor in the healthcare associated infections and infection prevention and control program at the Australian Commission in Safety and Quality in Health Care. Prior to her current role, Jan led the delivery of a statewide CAUTI prevention program in New South Wales and has undertaken key research into the transmission and control for respiratory viruses.

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